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Alumni > Chronicle: 1911-2008

Chronicle

LSU School of Renewable Natural Resources: 1911-2008

(Formerly: Department of Forestry, School of Forestry, School of Forestry & Wildlife Management,
School of Forestry, Wildlife, & Fisheries)

1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s

1911 The first forestry course, Elements of Forestry, was offered at LSU, taught by J.G. Lee, Sir., Professor of Horticulture.
1920 The first forestry summer camp (6 weeks) was held in tents near Bogalusa, for state forest rangers and others interested in forestry. It was sponsored by LSU in cooperation with the La. Conservation Commission, Division of Forestry. Not for college credit.
1923 The first two years of a forestry curriculum were offered, in the Dept. of Horticulture & Forestry, College of Agriculture. Henry Dave Story, Jr., BSF '28, was the first student to enroll. The first teachers were J.G. Lee, Sr., Professor of Horticulture (uncle of Jordan Gray Lee, Jr., who served as Dean of the LSU College of Agriculture from 1931 until 1956), Claude W. Edgerton, Professor of Botany; and V.H. Sonderegger, employee of the state Division of Forestry and a graduate of the Biltmore Forestry School in North Carolina 
1924 The third year of the forestry curriculum was offered. The LSU Forestry Club was organized, also called the LSU Society of Foresters, later (1975) becoming a Student Chapter of the Society of American Foresters. First club president: B.A. Bateman, who became in 1926 the first forestry graduate.
1925 The forestry curriculum was expanded to four years; Gordon D. Marckworth (MF Yale 1917) was added to the faculty.  Forestry was assigned one office, one classroom, and joint use of an additional classroom and a lab in Stubbs Hall; forestry summer field studies were conducted in Washington Parish at what became in 1927 The School Forest.
1926 The Department of Forestry was established, the second in the South (the University of Georgia's School of Forestry was first), with Major J.G. Lee, Sr., LSU Professor of Horticulture, as Head; Ralph W. Hayes was added to the faculty; the first BSF degree was awarded (to Bryant A. Bateman, who had taught 9 credits in forestry in 1925-26 while a student in 1925-26).  Instructional emphasis, then as now, was in both theory and practice.  Degrees granted: 1.
1927 Marckworth became Head of the Forestry Department; the School Forest (now named Lee Memorial Forest in honor of J.G. Lee, Sr., LSU's first forestry department head) of 1100 acres was donated to LSU by Great Southern Lumber Co.; the first camp buildings were constructed and used in summer camp instruction; the Department acquired an old Ford truck for use at camp. Along Highland Road through the new campus forestry students planted the live oaks which have become majestic as the years have gone by. The Department's first M.S. degree, major in entomology and forestry, was awarded; Marckworth was co-major professor. Degrees granted: 2 BSF & 1 M.S. Total 3.
1928 Forestry Department students and faculty established a small plantation of bottomland hardwoods on the LSU campus near the intersection of Dalrymple Drive and W. Lakeshore Dr. (across W. Lakeshore Dr. from what is now the International Culture Center). The 31-year growth of this plantation, which may be the first hardwood plantation in Louisiana, was described in LSU Forestry Note 37.  Many of the trees were still alive in the spring of 2006. Degrees granted: 3 BSF. Total 3.
1929 Ralph W. Hayes left LSU to teach at N.C. State's new Department of Forestry.  The first LSU forestry publication of record was issued in May: Survival and early growth of planted southern pine in southeastern Louisiana.  R.W. Hayes and P.C. Wakeley, 48 p. LSU Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull. XXI-N.S.  Many other publications on forestry, wildlife, and fisheries were issued subsequently, particularly after 1955, by the Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service as well as by the School itself.  Degrees granted 3 BSF. Total 3.
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1930 The Forestry Department acquired a small forest tree nursery site.  Degrees granted: 5 BSF. Total 5. 
1931 Marckworth left LSU to become Dean of the University of Georgia Forestry School, and in 1939 he went to the University of Washington, where a few years later he became Dean of the College of Forestry. Bryant A. Bateman was temporarily placed in charge of the Department of Forestry.  Degrees granted: 9 BSF. Total 9.
1932 As is common in forestry schools in the U.S., the faculty kept track as best it could of the locations, work, and personal information of its graduates.  Degrees granted: 9 BSF. Total 9.
1933 LSU decided that its Forestry Dept. would not meet the accreditation standards of the Society of American Foresters (SAF); the LSU administration decided to improve the department to meet these standards. Degrees granted: 2 BSF.  Total 2.
1934 Ralph W. Hayes returned as Head of the Department of Forestry; Dr. Alfred D. Folweiler was added to the faculty; the faculty increased to 3.  The Department was not accredited by the Society of American Foresters on the first grading.  A bus was provided for student transportation.  Degrees granted: 6 BSF. Total 6.
1935 he faculty was expanded to 5 members (Hayes, Bateman, Folweiler, Herbert B. McKean and Dr. Clair A. Brown, who worked half-time in Forestry, half-time in Botany).  The MF degree was initiated.  Karl H. Korte, from the Territory of Hawaii, received a B.S.F, becoming the first forestry graduate from outside the continental U.S.  Degrees granted: 5 BSF.  Total 5.
1936 The Department of Forestry moved to the basement of what then was Knapp Hall, the Agriculture Extension Bldg. (now Agriculture Administration Bldg.) with 14,600 sq. ft. of floor space.  The first MF degree was awarded.  A formal program of forestry research was started within the Agricultural Experiment Station.  Cleland H. Vaux was added to the faculty. From this time forward, most of the faculty members who taught students had joint teaching/research appointments.  Degrees granted: 3 BSF, 1 MF.  Total 4.  
1937 The forestry program was accredited (first in the South) by Society of American Foresters. The forest nursery was expanded. The first research was initiated on the School Forest. Degrees granted: 23 BSF, 2 MF. Total 25.
1938 The first annual edition of the Annual Ring was published by the LSU Forestry Club; pages 6 & 7 had article by Ralph Hayes on the history of forestry education at LSU. The Annual Ring, in addition to information on students and faculty and short articles on forestry, contained a listing of alumni by year of degree, normally showing the business address, when known, of each alumnus. News items about alumni were often included. This tradition continued until the 1968 edition. The final edition was in 1980. This year, 1938, marked the first edition of the Camp Log, an unofficial mimeographed publication written by and for the forestry camp students, without faculty input or censorship. It was a partially humorous diary-type commentary on life at the forestry summer camp; each day was assigned to a particular student to write. The most recent Camp Log in my files covered the camp in 1963. Degrees granted: 22 BSF, 0 MF. Total 22.
1939 School fall enrollment: 99 in College of Agriculture, 1 graduate student. Faculty: 7 including Dr. Clair Brown, Professor of Botany and Forestry, and J. Richard Dilworth, Instructor. The Annual Ring editor, Ivan R. AIke@ Martin, called for changing the status of the department to a School of Forestry, in the College of Agriculture; 9 years later, this was accomplished. Most forestry graduates had jobs in federal or state forestry; jobs in private forestry were few, because forestry was rarely practiced on privately owned land. Degrees granted: 20 BSF, 1MF. Total 21.
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1940 For the first time, forestry seniors took a month's educational trip in the South (required) beginning in April. This tradition continued through about 1958. Nu Chapter of Xi Sigma Pi, the national honor society for forestry students and faculty, was chartered at LSU. Henry H. “Hank” Chamberlin was added to the faculty. School fall enrollment: 83 in College of Agriculture, 1 graduate student. Faculty: 6. Degrees granted: 28 BSF, 1MF. Total 29.
1941 School fall enrollment: 59 in College of Agriculture, 2 graduate students. Faculty: 7. Elbert W. Kilgore joined the faculty as Instructor When the U.S. entered World War II in December, enrollment declined because of the demand for manpower in the Armed Forces. The School alumni began writing a constitution for an alumni association, completing this task in 1949. Degrees granted: 27 BSF, 2 MF. Total 29.
1942 School fall enrollment: 40 in College of Agriculture, 0 graduate students. Faculty: 9, including Dr. Clair Brown, Professor of Botany and Forestry, Dr. O.W. Rosewall, Professor of Entomology and Forestry, and H.H. Chamberlin, Instructor. From 1942 through 1945, Dr. Francis Kukachka conducted timber testing research in the Forestry Department for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Henry J. Vaux, a professional forester, was hired as Associate Economist by the La. Agricultural Experiment Station; he conducted forestry research in 1942-43 and apparently had no official connection with the forestry department. Vaux later served as Dean of the Forestry School, Univ. of California.
The department was re-accredited by the SAF. Summer camp was conducted at Lee Memorial Forest. Degrees granted: 15 BSF, 0 MF. Total 15.
1943 Faculty: 11, including Hayes, Bateman, Folweiler, Brown, Rosewall, Chamberlin, Dilworth, G. Eugene Tower, Instructor, Kukachka, and 3 men on leave of absence: Cleland Vaux, Herb McKean, and Dilworth. Most of the forestry alumni (all were men) were in military service during World War II; Hayes wrote to the alumni on Jan. 29 that there were at least 110 out of 176 graduates in the armed forces. Equipment for wood utilization research costing $25,000 was installed in the department. Degrees granted: 12 BSF, 0 MF. Total 12.
1944 Enrollment in forestry was drastically reduced because of men (there were no female forestry students) needed for the military in WW II; this was the only year no forestry degree was awarded. Degrees granted: 0.
1945 The total budget of the Dept. of Forestry was $38,000 for fiscal 1945-6, including both teaching & research. A curriculum in wood technology was established. Chamberlin left the faculty to become the head of a new forestry department at Arkansas A&M College, Monticello. The Forestry Department learned that 8 of its alumni died in World War II. Degrees granted: 1 BSF, 0 MF. Total 1.
1946 School fall enrollment: 104 in the College of Agriculture (until the fall of 1997, freshmen were in the Junior Division, normally entering the College of Agriculture as sophomores). Summer camp at the end of the junior year was resumed at Lee Memorial Forest. Faculty 8: A. Bigler Crow (new; replaced Folweiler), Dilworth, Richard F. West (new; replaced McKean), Bateman, Hayes, Vaux, Brown, Rosewall. Degrees granted: 3 BSF, 0 MF. Total 3.
1947 The first students were enrolled in a new MSGM (Master of Science in Game Management) program; forestry enrollment greatly increased because of men being discharged at the end of WW II and receiving G.I. Bill financial benefits. Faculty 7: Martin B. Applequist (new; replaced Dilworth), Charles O. Minor (new; replaced Vaux Sept. 1), West, Crow, Hayes, Bateman, Vaux (on leave, then resigned as of Sept. 1). School fall enrollment: 178 forestry majors in the College of Agriculture. There were 44 students in junior summer camp. Degrees granted: 9 BSF, 0 MF. Total 9.
1948 The Department's name was changed to School of Forestry July 1, with the Head becoming the Director (no change in its status as one of the departments in the College of Agriculture). The first MSGM degree was awarded. School fall enrollment: 199 in College of Agriculture. Because of the post-war boom in industrial forestry, many BSF graduates found work with industry; others were employed in federal or state forestry. MSGM graduates found work with state and federal wildlife agencies. At the fall Homecoming, the School's alumni adopted a constitution for the School of Forestry Alumni Association, with minor changes to be worked out. The President was Murray E. Brashiers >29. The Alumni Association has met annually at Homecoming since this time (6/03). Faculty: 6, including Hayes, Bateman, West, Crow, Applequist, and Minor. Degrees granted: 38 BSF, 5 MF, 1 MSGM. Total 44.
1949 Forestry research was started at Hill Farm Experiment Station, a branch of the La. Agricultural Experiment Station at Homer, by Thomas Hansbrough, B.S.F. LSU >49. He was the first forestry researcher stationed in a branch Experiment Station outside of Baton Rouge. Henry Vaux, a forester who was not a member of the Forestry Department faculty, had conducted a forest economics study for the La. Agric. Exp. Station before WW II. Faculty: 8, including Hayes, Bateman, West, Crow, Minor, Applequist, Leslie L. Glasgow (new), and William McD. Palmer (new). There were two sections of junior summer camp, because of the large enrollment. School fall enrollment: 166 in College of Agriculture, 11 graduate students. The School's Alumni Association, at its annual Fall Homecoming meeting, discussed the School's need for a separate Forestry Building, which would provide more and better space than that available in the basement of Knapp Hall, the Agricultural Extension Building (now the Agricultural Administration Bldg.). Degrees granted: 55 BSF, 2 MF, 5 MSGM. Total 62
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1950 The faculty numbered 8, the same men as in 1949. The largest number for one year, (78) BSF degrees were awarded. School fall enrollment: 85 in College of Agriculture, 10 graduate students. Junior camp: 39 students. The LSU Chapter of Xi Sigma Pi planned a new alumni newsletter, The LSU Forester, to be issued twice a year. Degrees granted: 78 BSF, 1 MF, 8 MSGM. Total 87.
1951 The faculty members numbered 8, the same men as in 1949 and 1950, except that in September Associate Professor Robert W. McDermid relaced William McD. Palmer. School fall enrollment: 65 in College of Agriculture, 10 graduate students. In December, the Alumni Association held a banquet in conjunction with the S.A.F. national meeting in Biloxi, MS. This tradition has extended to having social gatherings at subsequent annual S.A.F. meetings, as well as at state or regional S.A.F. meetings. Degrees granted: 37 BSF, 3 MF, 3 MSGM, Total 43.
1952 The First Annual Forestry Symposium was held on campus. Designed as a continuing education meeting for professional foresters, it was a pioneer effort by LSU. The symposia were held annually through 1985 and again in 1996, and Proceedings were widely disseminated. School fall enrollment: 52 in College of Agriculture, 1graduate student. Faculty 8: the same men as in late 1951, The status of the employment of the 426 graduates of the School as of January 1952: federal forestry 24, state forestry 63, private enterprise 172, wildlife management 18, teaching forestry 5, military 44, unknown 19, non-forestry 65, deceased 9. Degrees granted: 26 BSF, 4 MF, 4 MSGM. Total 34.
1953 The first of 149 LSU Forestry Notes was published, reporting on forestry research at the School. School enrollment: 57 in College of Agriculture, 6 graduate students. Junior camp: 19. Faculty 7: including Hayes, Bateman, Minor, McDermid, Applequist, Glasgow (on leave), and Crow. Degrees granted: 13 BSF, 0 MF, 0 MSGM. Total 13.
1954 Ralph W. Hayes resigned as Director, staying on the faculty as Professor of Forestry. School fall enrollment: 80 in College of Agriculture, 6 graduate students. Faculty 8: Applequist, Bateman, Crow, Glasgow, Arne K. Kemp (new), McDermid, Minor (resigned effective 9/1/54). Dr. Paul Y. Burns was appointed Director effective Feb. 1, 1955. Degrees granted: 21 BSF, 1 MF, 3 MSGM. Total 25.
1955 Paul Y. Burns resigned as Associate Professor, University of Missouri, and began work at LSU Feb. 1 as Director of the School and Professor of Forestry. Four curricula were offered: Forestry & Game Management, Forest Production, Forest Utilization, and Wood Technology. Each curriculum led to the B.S.F.; total 144 required semester hours. Professor R.W. McDermid was appointed Placement Officer, helping students obtain summer jobs in forestry and permanent jobs upon graduation. Summer forestry jobs were not required but were highly recommended to provide on-the-job experience as well as money needed for school expenses. The Pinettes Club (wives of forestry students) was organized, becoming a charter member in 1962 of the National Association of Forestry Students= Wives, and disbanding in 1966, when there were no longer enough married students to sustain interest in the organization. Faculty: 10, including Burns, Hayes, Glasgow, Bateman, McDermid, Crow, Applequist (on leave 1955-6), Wm. C. Hopkins & Charles B. Briscoe (began June 1), and Cedric Sydney (replaced Applequist for the fall semester 1955. School fall enrollment: 73 in College of Agriculture, 5 graduate students. Degrees granted: 12 BSF, 0 MF, 1 MSGM. Total 13.
1956 A new Forestry Building (in 1986 it became the Old Forestry Building) was completed on South Stadium Drive; 22,000 sq. ft. of floor space, including offices, classrooms, and laboratories; forest industries donated wood panelling of native wood species. The School pioneered in adult forestry education by giving an extension course for graduate credit; these extension courses extended until 1962. School fall enrollment: 78 in College of Agriculture, 15 graduate students. Degrees granted: 32 BSF, 2 MF, 2 MSGM. Total 36.
1957 The 4 BSF curricula were combined into one curriculum in forestry; 144 total sem. hrs. still required. Faculty: 10 (9 with teaching duties and one Research Instructor, Benton H. Box, who was stationed at Lee Forest). The School's 1957-58 teaching budget was $61,651, research budget $48,727 (about 1.5% of total Agricultural Experiment Station budget). An extension course in forestry for graduate credit was conducted at Homer; a total of 25 county agents, vocational agriculture teachers and other non-foresters took the course. School fall enrollment: 76 in College of Agriculture, 16 graduate students. Degrees granted: 25 BSF, 4 MF, 6 MSGM. Total 35.
1958 A forestry greenhouse was constructed, the first one in the history of the School. School fall enrollment: 79 in College of Agriculture, 14 graduate students. Degrees granted: 29 BSF, 7 MF, 2 MSGM. Total 38.
1959 The first fisheries faculty member, Dr. R. Jess Muncy, was hired. Prior to his coming, Dr. B.A. Bateman had taught 2 fisheries courses for game management students. School fall enrollment: 67 in College of Agriculture, 17 graduate students. Degrees granted: 38 BSF, 7 MF, 2 MSGM. Total 47.
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1960 The first of 39 LSU Wood Utilization Notes was published, reporting on wood utilization research at the School. A cooperative agreement with the Louisiana Forestry Commission for bottomland hardwood research was signed, including employment by the Louisiana Forestry Commission of full-time scientist Anatol Kaszkurewicz. Educated in forestry in Poland, he was housed at the School; the agreement was terminated in 1975 when Kaszkurewicz retired. On Sept. 16, the Russian delegation to the 5th World Forestry Congress, held in the U.S., made a forestry tour of the Mid-South, stopping for an hour's visit at the LSU Forestry School. There were 20 men, accompanied by a woman KGB interpreter. They presented Director Burns with 2 copies of their bound Forestry Congress papers (in Russian with English translation), one for the LSU Library and one for him. School fall enrollment: 65 in College of Agriculture, 21 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 31, MF 8, MSGM 4. Total 43.
1961 MS programs in fisheries, forestry, & forest products technology were authorized. The School sponsored a Conference on Wooden Utility Poles. Poo Chow (Taiwan), Khaja A. Khan (India), and Joao M.F. Lisboa (Brazil) became the first international students in the School to earn a graduate degree (MF). School fall enrollment: 64 in College of Agriculture, 23 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 26, MF 11, MSGM 6. Total 43.
1962 The School's name was changed to School of Forestry and Wildlife Management; a La. Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit (U.S. Dept. of Interior) was established at the School; the Ph.D. degree in forestry was initiated; the forestry program was re-accredited by S.A.F.; federal funds for forestry research (McIntire-Stennis funds)were made available on an annual basis to U.S. forestry schools, resulting in a great increase in the number of forestry graduate students because of the substantial increase in the money available for graduate research assistantships. School fall enrollment: 78 in College of Agriculture, 22 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 16, MF 2, MSGM 3, MS (fisheries) 1 (the first time this degree was awarded). Total 22.
1963 A La. Cooperative Fisheries Research Unit was established at the School. Later the two Coop. Units were merged into one: the La. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, and the four federally paid scientists (later reduced to three) have served on the graduate faculty of the School ever since. The School sponsored a Conference on Outdoor Recreation. School fall enrollment: 67 in College of Agriculture, 42 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 31, MF 4, MS (forestry) 2, MS (forest products technology) 2, MSGM 4. Total 43.
1964 School fall enrollment: 81 in College of Agriculture, 46 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 17, MF 3, MS (forestry) 1, MS (forest products technology) 1, MSGM 4, MS (fisheries) 1. Total 27.
1965 The School's faculty established an Alumnus-of-the-Year Award and selected the first recipient. The purpose of the award was to provide faculty recognition of an alumnus/alumna who has an outstanding record of service to his or her profession and to the public. The award has been presented at the annual meeting of the School's alumni association. Training sessions for employees of the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission were held. School fall enrollment: 93 in College of Agriculture, 59 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 23, MF 5, MS (forestry) 1, MSGM 6, MS (fisheries) 3. Total 38.
1966 The first PhD in forestry was awarded. Dr. James W. Avault, Jr. was added to the faculty, and he initiated research in aquaculture, including raising crawfish in ponds. Professor L.L. Glasgow took leave from the faculty to serve as Director of the La. Wildlife & Fisheries Commission; he served 3 years. School fall enrollment: 102 in College of Agriculture, 51 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 26, MF 10, MS (fisheries) 4, MSGM 4, PhD (forestry) 2. Total 46.
1967 Coordinated by Prof. R.W. McDermid, the first Timber Harvesting Shortcourse was held; these shortcourses were sponsored by the School through 1972; a Symposium on Marsh Management was held. Forestry summer camp instruction was moved to the campus and LSU's Idlewild Experiment Station near Clinton. Idlewild, with its large area of forest, has been the site of many forestry and wildlife field studies, including one of the few captive deer research herds in the U.S. Central air-conditioning was installed in the Forestry Building. Several years earlier, Director Burns persuaded the LSU Administration to allow him to purchase with his own money a window air conditioner for his office and the School's two secretaries= office. Also, the Administration allowed him to install a window unit in a wood research laboratory at LSU's expense. School fall enrollment: 91 in College of Agriculture, 40 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 32, MF 8, MS (forestry) 1, MS (fisheries) 4, MSGM 11, PhD (forestry) 1. Total 57.
1968 A BS curriculum in Wood Science initiated; it was terminated in 1977 after 13 degrees were awarded. School fall enrollment: 88 in College of Agriculture, 42 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 25, MF 7, MS (forest products technology 3, MS (fisheries) 1, MSGM 7, PhD (forestry) 2. Total 45.
1969 For the first time, females received degrees from the School: Sonie M. Moore was awarded a BSF degree; Edmonde Jeanne M. Jaspers was awarded an MS (fisheries). The Wildlife Club was organized; new office and lab space was gained for fisheries and wildlife in Parker Coliseum, an agricultural facility; Professor L.L. Glasgow took leave to serve as Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of Interior; he served 2 years. Fall enrollment: 86 in College of Agriculture, 31 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 27, MF 5, MS (forest products technology) 1, MS (forestry) 5, MS (fisheries) 7, MSGM 10, PhD (forestry) 2. Total 57.
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1970 Led by Prof. Avault, the School hosted the first annual workshop of the World Mariculture Society (later the World Aquaculture Society). Parker Coliseum serves as the home office for this Society as of this writing. The School sponsored seminars on wildlife diseases 1970-72. The faculty prepared a Self-Analysis and Plan for 1970-80 for the School. Director Burns established an “Alumni Tree Dedication” project, located at Lee Memorial Forest, where each of the School’s alumni had a particular planted pole-size pine with his/her name on it. School fall enrollment: 90 in College of Agriculture, 50 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 32, MF 1, MS (forest products technology) 1, MS (fisheries) 2, MSGM 4, PhD (forestry) 2. Total 42.
1971 The School's alumni association formed a School Study Committee, to help the School improve. School fall enrollment: 123 in College of Agriculture, 63 graduate students (increases over 1970 of 37% and 26%, respectively, because of the growing environmental movement). Degrees granted: BSF 40, MF 2, MS (forest products technology) 3, MS (forestry) 4, MS (fisheries) 3, MSGM 10, PhD (forestry) 1. Total 63.
1972 chool fall enrollment: 158 in College of Agriculture, 76 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 24, BS (wood science and utilization) 3, MF 2, MS (forestry) 7, MS (forest products technology) 2, MSGM 5, MS (fisheries) 4, PhD (forestry) 0. Total 47.
1973 The School faculty prepared a Self-evaluation Report for the Committee on Accreditation, Society of American Foresters; the SAF Council accredited the School's forestry program, depending on the results of an inspection in 1976 (criticism was made of the curriculum and the lack of building space). The MSGM degree was dropped, and the graduate wildlife program was changed to MS with major in wildlife. The School graduated its first African-American: Albert J. Doucette, Jr. received the MS in fisheries. School fall enrollment: 179 in College of Agriculture, 71 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 40, BS (wood science & utilization) 3, MF 2, MS (forestry) 7, MS (forest products technology) 0, MSGM 6, MS (wildlife) 3, MS (fisheries) 8, PhD (forestry) 4. Total 73.
1974 The School began a review of the Ph.D. program in forestry, which was completed in 1976. The School hosted a Symposium of the International Association of Astacology (crawfish). School fall enrollment: 187 in College of Agriculture, 77 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 41, BS (wood science and utilization) 0, MF 0, MS (forestry) 3, MS (forest products technology) 2, MS (wildlife) 9, MS (fisheries) 6, PhD (forestry) 1. Total 62.
1975 The Fisheries Section of the School prepared a statement on long-range fisheries goals. The LSU Forestry Club became a Student Chapter of the Gulf States Section, Society of American Foresters. Degrees granted: BSF 53, BS (wood science and utilization) 2, MF 1, MS (forestry) 6, MS (forest products technology) 1, MS (wildlife) 12, MS (fisheries) 7, PhD (forestry) 2. Total 84.
1976 The School's forestry program was re-accredited by the Society of American Foresters. Dr. Paul Y. Burns resigned as Director effective December 1, remaining on the faculty as Professor of Forestry. Dr. Thomas Hansbrough became Director and Professor of Forestry, returning to LSU from the University of Kentucky, where he served as Head of the Forestry Department since 1970. School fall enrollment: 215 in College of Agriculture (highest to-date) , 88 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 53, BS (wood science and utilization) 3, MS (forestry) 7, MS (wildlife) 9, MS (fisheries) 9, PhD (forestry) 4. Total 85
1977 Director Hansbrough began plans to obtain funds for a new building for the School, which had outgrown the available physical space. Fisheries personnel at this time were housed in Parker Coliseum. The doctoral program in forestry was reviewed by a team of scholars from outside of Louisiana. Administration of Lee Forest was changed from the Main Campus to the Agricultural Experiment Station. Professor C. Leroy Shilling was appointed Placement Officer to assist students find both summer and permanent jobs in forestry or wildlife management. Several years later Shilling's title within the School was changed to Director of Student Services, and his duties were expanded to include recruiting undergraduates and providing advice in their academic programs. School fall enrollment: 166 in College of Agriculture, 90 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 68, BS (wood science and utilization) 2, MS (forestry) 5, MS (wildlife) 9, MS (fisheries) 11, PhD (forestry) 2. Total 96, the largest number of School graduates in its history through 2005
1978 There was a review of the Ph.D. in forestry by the Louisiana Board of Regents. The LSU/MSU Logging & Forestry Operations Center was established as a cooperative project in Bay St. Louis, MS, later becoming the Forestry & Harvesting Training Center at Long Beach, MS, terminated in 1984. School fall enrollment: 132 in the College of Agriculture, 88 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 46, MS (forestry) 2, MS (wildlife) 8, MS (fisheries) 13, PhD (forestry) 0. Total 69.
1779 The Board of Regents reviewed forestry education in Louisiana. School fall enrollment: 101 in College of Agriculture, 87 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 39, MS (forestry) 3, MS (forest product technology) 1, MS (wildlife) 6, MS (fisheries) 11, PhD (forestry) 1. Total 61.
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1980 A report, Coordination of Forestry Education in Louisiana, was submitted by Director Hansbrough to the Louisiana Board of Regents. A Louisiana state Aquaculture Plan was developed, serving as a blueprint for the LSU AgCenter in hiring new faculty and in facility development. The Annual Ring, the School's student publication, first published in 1938, and subsequently a joint venture of the SAF student chapter and the Forestry and Wildlife Alumni Association, ceased publication after the 1980 issue. School fall enrollment: 82 in College of Agriculture, 67 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 27, MS (forestry) 6, MS (forest products technology) 1, MS (wildlife) 7, MS (fisheries) 7, PhD (forestry) 0. Total 48
1981 The PhD in wildlife and fisheries science, with concentration in either wildlife or fisheries, was approved by the Louisiana Board of Regents. School fall enrollment: 66 in College of Agriculture, 69 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 24, MS (forestry) 2, MS (wildlife) 6, MS (fisheries) 8, PhD (forestry) 1.Total 81
1982 Self-studies were conducted of Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station research programs in forestry, wildlife and recreation, and aquaculture/fisheries. Forestry summer camp was moved back to Lee Memorial Forest; the lodge & kitchen were remodeled; a new building with office space and a female dormitory was constructed; the Louisiana Legislature approved a cash outlay of $8.3 million for construction of a Forestry-Wildlife-Fisheries Building. School fall enrollment: 64 in College of Agriculture, 65 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 17, MS (forestry) 5, MS (forest products technology) 1, MS (wildlife) 7, MS (fisheries) 9, PhD (forestry) 0. Total 39.
1983 The School's appropriated funds budget for FY 1983-84 was $368,085 for teaching and $1,054,858 for research, including McIntire-Stennis federal funds for forestry research. A team from the national agricultural research organization, CSRS, reviewed the School's research programs in forestry, wildlife, and fisheries. The faculty prepared a Self-Evaluation Report for the Committee on Accreditation, Society of American Foresters. The first of 16 Research Reports of the School was published, reporting on research in forestry, wildlife, and fisheries. Facilities at Lee Forest were renovated, and the entire forestry summer camp program was held at Lee Forest, the first time since 1966. School fall enrollment: 69 in College of Agriculture, 61 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 17, MS (forestry) 4, MS (forest products technology) 1 (the last time this degree was granted), MS (wildlife) 13, MS (fisheries) 7, PhD (forestry) 0. Total 42.
1984 The School's name was changed to School of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries, recognizing the increased importance of fisheries in the School's teaching and research. The BSF program was re-accredited by the S.A.F. for 10 years, with a progress report covering certain topics due in 1990. School fall enrollment: 53 in College of Agriculture, 68 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 18, MS (forestry) 4, MS (wildlife) 13, MS (fisheries) 3, PhD (forestry) 0. Total 38
1985 The MF and MS in forest products technology degrees were dropped; student interest was lacking in these degree programs. School fall enrollment: 57 in College of Agriculture, 67 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 21, MS (forestry) 5, MS (wildlife) 6, MS (fisheries) 7, PhD (forestry) 0. Total 39.
1986 A new Forestry-Wildlife-Fisheries Building, located across Highland Road from Parker Coliseum, was occupied in June and dedicated in October. It contained 73,000 sq. ft. of space and cost $7 million, including construction, furniture & equipment, telephone & computer lines, and planning. In August 2000 Dr. Thomas Hansbrough wrote an 11-page report: Development of the Forestry-Wildlife-Fisheries Building, in which he outlined the steps he took beginning in 1977 to obtain this new, much-needed facility. He wrote about the help he received from forest industry leaders, Gov. David Treen and his administration, the alumni of the School, the School's faculty, legislators, and others. The Gilbert Foundation Forestry Fellowship program was established to support graduate students specializing in forestry. A progress report was submitted by the School to the Committee on Accreditation, Society of American Foresters. Former Director Paul Y. Burns retired and was named Professor Emeritus of Forestry. School faculty numbered 22, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 50 in College of Agriculture (lowest since World War II), 61 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 9, MS (forestry) 4, MS (wildlife) 8, MS (fisheries) 7, PhD (forestry) 1.Total 29.
1987 The BSF curriculum in Forestry-Wildlife was dropped; a BS curriculum was established in wildlife & fisheries with options in wildlife, fisheries, and aquaculture; graduates of this curriculum were able to work toward certification as a wildlife biologist by The Wildlife Society. The first Ph.D in wildlife & fisheries science was granted. School fall enrollment: 49 in College of Agriculture, 22 in Jr. Div., 60 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 13, MS (forestry) 1, MS (wildlife) 5, MS (fisheries) 4, PhD (forestry) 1, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 3. Total 27.
1988 Thomas Hansbrough retired as Director and Professor of Forestry and was named Professor and Director Emeritus. Dr. Stanley B. Carpenter, who had been serving as Professor and Head of the Department of Forestry, Oklahoma A & M. University, accepted the position of Director of the School, effective July 1. School fall enrollment: 63 in College of Agriculture, 57 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 12, MS (forestry) 2, MS (wildlife) 5, MS (fisheries) 2, PhD (forestry) 3, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 3. Total 27.
1989 Documents were prepared for the School's Forestry Steering Committee in May, containing detailed information about the School and its teaching and research programs. The School's goal in forming this 14-member committee was to get an outside evaluation of its programs and suggestions for improvements. An Interim Status Report was prepared for the Committee on Accreditation, Society of American Foresters. School faculty: 23, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 67 in College of Agriculture, 47 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 11, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 2, MS (forestry) 3, MS (wildlife) 7, MS (fisheries) 9, PhD (forestry) 2, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 4. Total 38.
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1990 LSU's crawfish research facility, located at Ben Hur Farm south of the campus, became perhaps the largest crawfish research facility in the world; the School co-hosted a Symposium of the International Association of Astacology. There was a CSRS Review of the School's Research Programs. The BSF graduation requirement was decreased from 144 semester hours to 133, to take effect in 1991. Three steering committees: Fisheries & Aquaculture, Forestry, & Wildlife, were established, consisting of key supporters outside the School of these disciplines; the purpose was to help the School develop its teaching and research programs. The School co-sponsored a continuing education project: the two-weeks Forest Products Industry Management Development Program. The first issue was published of the School of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries Newsletter; through April 2003 there were 14 issues. School faculty: 22, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 67 in College of Agriculture, 39 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 7, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 4, MS (forestry) 1, MS (wildlife) 3, MS (fisheries) 1, PhD (forestry) 2, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 5. Total 23.
1991 A new Aquaculture Research Facility, 22,000 sq. ft., consisting of offices, conference room, computer room, and laboratories, was constructed at Ben Hur Farm. A Mission Statement for the School was adopted. The teaching goal was to provide undergraduate and graduate students with diverse and comprehensive curricula that cover policies, theories, research developments and technological advances in the fields of forestry, wildlife, fisheries, and aquaculture. Research goals were to understand factors influencing tree growth; demonstrate the value of forests as ecosystems as well as timber sources; determine the economic contribution of forestry, wildlife, fisheries, and aquaculture to Louisiana's economy; demonstrate the ecological importance of wetlands and coastal marshes and relationships between human activities and natural resource production; determine location of critical habitats for wildlife and fisheries and how to restore and maintain them; understand the factors that determine aquacultural production and increase efficiency of producing, harvesting, processing, and marketing cultured fishes and invertebrates. The public service goal was to promote efficient management and harvest of renewable natural resources in Louisiana by the dissemination of current research results and management practices to the public, both directly through symposia and semi-technical publications, and through educational programs developed with the La. Cooperative Extension Service. Program leaders in 4 disciplines were appointed: forestry/forest products (Peter J. Fogg), wildlife (Robert H. Chabreck), natural fisheries (William E. Kelso), and aquaculture (James W. Avault, Jr.). A Progress Report was prepared for the Committee on Accreditation, Society of American Foresters. A list of publications in 1991 by the School's research faculty showed 16 in forestry, 31 in wildlife, and 26 in fisheries. School faculty: 21, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 92 in College of Agriculture, 65 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 8, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 10, MS (forestry) 0, MS (wildlife) 3, MS (fisheries) 3, PhD (forestry) 0, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 3. Total 27
1992 Forestry summer camp became Spring Camp, a laboratory was created by the state legislature; the major part of the lab was housed in the LSU School of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries; the balance was housed in the School of Forestry, La Tech University, Ruston; funds for this lab provided for graduate research assistantships and professors serving on the graduate faculty. A 3 +1 curriculum was approved for wildlife students interested in obtaining the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree at LSU. Minors were approved in undergraduate curricula: fisheries, aquaculture, fish and wildlife conservation, forestry, and wildlife. School faculty: 25, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 89 in College of Agriculture, 44 in Junior Division, 69 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 2, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 12, MS (forestry) 1, MS (wildlife) 1, MS (fisheries) 3, PhD (forestry) 1, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 0. Total 20.
1993 School faculty: 26, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 90 in College of Agriculture, 98 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 10, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 17, MS (forestry) 2, MS (wildlife) 8, MS (fisheries) 6, PhD (forestry) 1, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 0. Total 44.
1994 A Self-Evaluation report was completed in April, and the forestry program was re-accredited by the Society of American Foresters; the graduate wildlife program was re-accredited by the Southeastern Chapter of The Wildlife Society. The William A. Knight Estate gave the School 210 acres near Lee Forest and approximately $168,000 for an endowed account in the LSU Foundation. The School topped all LSU Agriculture unit programs in bringing in extramural research funds in excess of 3 million dollars. An Information Handbook was prepared for the School, containing a brief history, mission statement, list of research projects, courses and faculty teaching assignments, committee assignments, Steering and Advisory Committees (Forestry, Forest Products Utilization, Wildlife, and Fisheries), Clubs and Organizations (LSU Student Chapter of the Society of American Foresters, Wildlife Society, Xi Sigma Pi forestry honor society, and Fish and Aquaculture Club), and scholarships. School faculty: 23, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 112 in the College of Agriculture, 116 graduate students. The first non-thesis degree (MS in wildlife) was awarded in the School. Degrees granted: BSF 10, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 18, MS (forestry) 2, MS (wildlife) 3, MS (fisheries) 11, PhD (forestry) 4, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 2. Total 50.
1995 A Token Ring computer network was installed in F-W-F Building; providing e-mail and access to the Internet for each faculty member. An endowed scholarship program in wildlife was established in the School, honoring Charles W. Bosch, Jr.: endowed principal $100,000. The School offered undergraduate minors in forestry, wildlife, natural fisheries, aquaculture, & wildlife & fisheries conservation. FISH 1001, Natural Resource Conservation, was added to the list of approved natural science courses in LSU's general education curriculum. School faculty: 27, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 149 in College of Agriculture (beginning fall 1995, freshmen majoring in one of the College of Agriculture curricula were not required to go through the Junior Division) , 121 graduate students, the largest number to-date. Degrees granted: BSF 9, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 10, MS (forestry) 2, MS (wildlife) 12, MS (fisheries) 3, PhD (forestry) 2, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 3. Total 41.
1996 The 35th annual LSU Forestry Symposium was held, the first since 1985, and proceedings were published. No LSU Forestry Symposia were held through 2002. School faculty: 28, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 201 in College of Agriculture, 117 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 20, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 11, MS (forestry) 4, MS (wildlife) 9, MS (fisheries) 6, PhD (forestry) 2, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 5. Total 57.
1997 Dr. Stanley Carpenter resigned as Director of the School as of Oct. 1, 1997, remaining on the faculty as Professor of Forestry. Dr. Norwin E. Linnartz, Professor Emeritus of Forestry at LSU, was named Interim Director. Scholarships & awards: Glasgow, Charles Bosch Wildlife/Waterfowl, FWF Alumni (one scholarship named the Lehmann Scholarship), William A. Knight, Forestry Alumni, Harold Werner Olson Forestry, Marc Dupuy, Jr. Wildlife Conservation, Hopkins Memorial, F.O. Bateman Memorial, A. Bigler Crow Forestry, Hunter Barrilleaux Memorial, La. Land & Exploration Corp., Boise-Cascade Forestry, Ag Development for Forestry, Louisiana Forestry Foundation including Seedlings & Saplings, Xi Sigma Pi. The Spring issue of Louisiana Agriculture was a Forestry Issue,@ containing articles on the School's current research and on Lee Memorial Forest. School faculty: 27, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 220 in College of Agriculture, 110 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 25, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 15, MS (forestry) 5, MS (wildlife) 9, MS (fisheries) 10, PhD (forestry) 2, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 2. Total 68.
1998 The Aquaculture Research Station was created, effective July 1, at the Ben Hur Farm as a branch of the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station; the station conducted the research in aquaculture formerly in the School of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries. The aquaculture faculty members were given joint appointments in the School for teaching. The PhD in forestry was earned by Robert C. Davidge, Sr. at age 84, oldest person on record to receive an LSU degree. Dr. Bob Karr accepted the position of Director of the School, to begin work sometime in 1999. The F.O. Bateman endowed Professorship was established; The George W. Barineau, Jr. endowed Professorship in Game Management was established; there were as yet no matching funds from the state of Louisiana. The School was the unit of the Agriculture Experiment Station which had the largest total grant funds$2.14 million. School faculty: 27, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 218 in College of Agriculture, 104 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 24, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 24, MS (forestry) 3, MS (wildlife) 10, MS (fisheries) 6, PhD (forestry) 4, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 2. Total 73.
1999 Dr. Bob Karr, who had accepted the Director's position late in 1998, decided not to come to LSU because of illness. Dr. N.E. Linnartz continued as Interim Director. Dr. C.L. Shilling, Professor of Forestry, was named Acting Assistant Director. The School's made its first faculty joint appointment with Cooperative Extension: Dr. Todd F. ShupeB60% research, 40% extension. Two 4-year professional undergraduate curricula were offered: (1) Forestry, leading to the B.S.F., 134 semester hours, with 2 areas of concentration: Ecosystem Management and Forest Management. (2) Wildlife and Fisheries, leading to the B.S., 135 sem. hrs., with 5 areas of concentration: (1) Aquaculture, (2) Fisheries, (3) Fish and Wildlife Conservation, (4) Wildlife, (5) Three-Plus-One (preparation for the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine). LSU's Cooperative Education Program was being utilized by a number of undergraduates, allowing students to combine on-campus course work with paid on-the-job training in business, industry, or government agencies. Also, some undergraduates took summer or semester jobs as Interns. Graduate degrees offered remained the same since 1981: M.S. in fisheries, in forestry, & in wildlife; Ph.D. in forestry and in wildlife & fisheries science. A SAF Accreditation Interim Status Report for the BSF degree was submitted. The Weaver Brothers Professorship in Forestry, Wildlife, & Fisheries was established, funded with an endowment given in the names of Burton D. Weaver, Jr. (BSF LSU >60), Sue Weaver, and their children. The Billy W. Weaver (BSF LSU >52) endowed forestry scholarship was established. The total faculty members on March 30 was 28, counting the 3 Adjunct faculty housed in the School's building, but not counting other Adjunct Faculty and Professors Emeriti. A Brief History of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries Education at LSU, prepared by Dr. P.Y. Burns, was submitted as part of the plan for the campus Jubilee Celebration in 2000. Beginning with the Summer 1999 issue, the School's newsletter carried news about alumni of the School.
The number and percentage of international students obtaining graduate degrees from the School increased from zero in the decades before 1960 to 5 (3%) in the 1960s, 21 (9%) in the 1970s, to 18 (9%) in the 1980s, and to 35 (18%) in the 1990s. School fall enrollment: 205 in College of Agriculture, 112 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 17, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 18, MS (forestry) 5, MS (wildlife) 13, MS (fisheries) 3, PhD (forestry) 0, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 5. Total 62.
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2000 Dr. Bob G. Blackmon left his position as Dean of the School of Forestry Resources, University of Arkansas at Monticello, to begin work February 1 as Professor of Forestry and Director of the School. The School underwent a combined LSU Internal Academic Program Review and a USDA-CSREES Research and Extension Review. The lack of gender diversity (predominantly male) within the faculty was a concern by the review teams as well as the faculty and staff. The forestry and wildlife Cooperative Extension faculty were transferred to the School because of a change in the Ag Center's policy: subject matter extension personnel were moved to their appropriate subject matter academic departments. On July 1 the internal organization of the School became: Associate Director, Dr. William E. Kelso; Coordinator of Undergraduate Education and Student Services, Dr. C. Leroy Shilling; Coordinator of Graduate Education and Research, Dr. D. Allen Rutherford; Forest Products Program Leader, Dr. Ramsay Smith; Forestry Program Leader, Dr. Jim L. Chambers; Wildlife/Fisheries Program Leader, Dr. Frank C. Rohwer; Aquaculture Program (Teaching) Leader, Dr. Robert P. Romaire; Extension Natural Resources Program Leader, Dr. Michael A. Dunn. Along with the Director, this group constituted the School's Executive Committee. Also on July 1, Ms. Nedra Wilson (later Nedra Ghoram) joined the School as Assistant to the Director, a newly created position. On September 23 the School celebrated its 75th anniversary. The celebration coincided with LSU's Homecoming and the Campus Jubilee, A75 Years Under the Oaks and Arches: Building on the Legacy of the Past for the New Century. At this time the School's Alumni Association held its annual meeting. A video of some of the School's history was prepared and shown to alumni, and students in Dr. C.L. Shilling's Forest Recreation class presented a report on the School's history. The School established a program for raising funds to support the School's needs called the New Level of Excellence Initiative; the first effort was to establish a Student Technology Endowment Fund. In November the LSU Ag Center announced its attempt to establish an endowed professorship in honor of Dr. Robert H. Chabreck, called the Robert H. Chabreck Coastal Wildlife Resource Management Professorship. School faculty: 29, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 178 in the College of Agriculture, 87 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 27, BS (wildlife and fisheries) 27, MS (forestry) 5, MS (wildlife)10, MS (fisheries) 4, PhD (forestry ) 2, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 7. Total 82.
2001 A faculty team from the School, with Honduran forest products counterparts, began work on an economic development/forest sustainability cooperative project in Honduras. The School established a website on the Internet. Dr. Jim L. Chambers received the Weaver Brothers Distinguished Professorship in forestry, making Chambers the first of the School's faculty members to receive an endowed professorship. In August, matching money was made available from the Louisiana Board of Regents for a large number of LSU's endowed professorships, including the F.O. Bateman Distinguished Professorship in Forestry. The late Dr. Elvin T. Choong was honored by the establishment of the Choong Endowed Lecture Series. Faculty continued their long tradition of service, providing advice on forestry, wildlife, and fisheries problems to the general public upon request. Director Blackmon reported to the FWF alumni meeting in the fall that a curricula review was being conducted in the School, but the present degrees would be retained. New faculty added: Dr. Hallie Dozier, Asst. Extension Specialist, Natural Resources (first female faculty member in the School); Dr. John Andrew Nyman, Asst. Professor, wildlife. School faculty: 27, not including adjunct or emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 150 in the College of Agriculture, 82 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 18, BS (wildlife & fisheries) 22, MS (forestry) 2, MS (wildlife) 5, MS (fisheries) 4, PhD (forestry) 1, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 1. Total 53.
2002 The name of the School of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries was changed officially on January 24 to the School of Renewable Natural Resources. There was no change in the School's programs as a result of the name change. The 2001-2002 General Catalog showed the following numbers of faculty: 14 professors, 10 associate professors, 3 assistant professors, 11 adjunct faculty, and 9 professors emeriti. The Spring 2002 issue of Louisiana Agriculture was devoted to Louisiana wildlife and fisheries; it included a statement by Director Blackmon about the School's new direction. A new undergraduate brochure was prepared showing the offering of the two degrees B.S.F. and B.S. with major in wildlife/fisheries, with ten areas of concentration: Aquaculture, Human Dimensions (later withdrawn), Fisheries, Forest Resource Management, Ecological Restoration, Wildlife Ecology, Wetland Science, Conservation Biology, Forest Products, and Wildlife Law Enforcement. The School's Sept. 13 directory listed 32 faculty members, including the 3 adjunct faculty members in the Coop. Fish & Wildlife Research Unit, but not including other adjunct faculty or professors emeriti. School faculty: 29, not including adjunct and emeritus faculty. Fall enrollment: 136 RNR students in the College of Agriculture, 77 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 16, BS wildlife & fisheries 23, MS (forestry) 1, MS (wildlife) 6, MS (fisheries) 6, PhD (forestry) 3, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 3. Total 58.
2003 Roy O. Martin Lumber Co., Alexandria, LA, donated $30,000 to the LSU Ag Center and pledged $30,000 more to fund the Roy O. Martin, Sr. Professorship in Composite and Engineered Wood Products, honoring the man who founded the company in 1923. Ben and Pauline Bateman Stanley (niece of the late Prof. Bryant Bateman and mother of two LSU forestry graduates) established the Ben and Pauline Stanley Bateman Endowment to provide money to the School for student recruitment, fundraising, outside speaker costs, and classroom technology. Prof. William E. Kelso was named the first recipient of the F.O. Bateman Professorship; the late F.O. Bateman pioneered in science-based forestry in Louisiana. Dr. Sammy King succeeded Dr. C.F. Bryan as Leader, Louisiana Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit (USGS); King was appointed Adjunct Professor of Renewable Natural Resources. Faculty members who left the School in 2003 included Dr. Mark K. Johnson, who retired, and Dr. Brian Lockhart, who resigned. Dr. Philip Stouffer, conservation biologist, joined the faculty. The Louisiana Forest Products Laboratory changed its name to the Louisiana Forest Products Development Center. The LSU Agricultural Center expanded its forestry project into the Extension Natural Resources Program, which involved five professorial faculty members on the main LSU campus, two professorial faculty members in field offices, and five area agents located throughout Louisiana. The Forestry, Wildlife, & Fisheries Alumni Association, through the La. Forestry Foundation, established the Norwin Linnartz Memorial Scholarship. School academic course names were changed to Renewable Natural Resources@ (RNR) in the 2003-04 LSU General Catalog; course names were generally indicative of the content (fisheries, forestry, or wildlife, or renewable natural resources in general). Degrees offered were unchanged: B.S. in Forestry, B.S. major in wildlife and fisheries; M.S. major in either forestry, or wildlife, or fisheries; Ph.D. major in either forestry or wildlife & fisheries science. RNR faculty listed in this School totaled 14 professors, 10 associate professors, 4 assistant professors, 18 adjunct faculty, and 10 professor emeritii. School fall enrollment: 121in College of Agriculture (37 forestry, 85 wildlife & fisheries), 79 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 15, BS wildlife & fisheries 14, MS (forestry) 5, MS (wildlife) 10, MS (fisheries) 5, PhD (forestry) 6, PhD (wildlife & fisheries science) 2. Total 58. Total alumni 2,633, including deceased.
2004 An undergraduate program in Natural Resource Ecology and Management was established to provide an umbrella for studies in conservation biology, fisheries, natural resources, wildlife ecology, wetland science, and wildlife law enforcement. The Bryant A. Bateman Professorship in Natural Resources was awarded to Dr. Allen Rutherford, and the Roy O. Martin Sr. Endowed Professorship in Composite and Engineered Wood Products was awarded to Dr. Qinglin Wu. By the end of 2004 the School had five endowed professorships, including the two above and the Weaver Brothers in Forestry, F.O. Bateman in Natural Resources, and Geo. William Barineau, Jr. in Wildlife Ecology. Joining the faculty in 2004 were Dr. Richard Keim, specializing in forested wetland ecology, and Dr. Craig Miller, specializing in human dimensions of natural resources. Graphic Packaging International gave the LSU Ag Center $10,000 to establish the Graphic Packaging Forest Sustainability Fund in the School. A fundraising campaign was begun to establish the Paul Y. Burns Scholarship through the LSU Foundation. Professor Emeritus and still active in helping the School, Burns served as School director from 1955 through 1976. Two issues of the School's newsletter were printed, one in February and one in December; alumni news was covered in the School’s newsletter rather than in a separate publication. Student organizations (chapters of The Wildlife Society, the Society of American Foresters, the Fisheries and Aquaculture Club, and Xi Sigma Pi honorary forestry society) maintained high levels of activity. RNR faculty continued to be very successful in obtaining research and extension grants, annually bringing in $1 to $1.5 million. School faculty: 31 on Aug. 24, not including adjunct or emeritus faculty. School fall enrollment: 125 RNR students in College of Agriculture (31 forestry, 94 wildlife & fisheries), 83 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 10, BS wildlife & fisheries 19, MS (forestry) 4, MS (wildlife) 5, MS (fisheries) 4, Ph.D. (forestry) 2, Ph.D. (wildlife & fisheries science) 0. Total 44.
2005 Director Bob G. Blackmon retired from LSU at the end of June. Dr. William E. Kelso was appointed Interim Director. A fisheries specialist, Kelso was F.O. Bateman Professor and Associate Director of the School. The School received a re-accreditation visit from a team assigned by the Society of American Foresters. The School revised its undergraduate program, keeping its B.S.F. curriculum, which will have three areas of concentration: (1) Forest Resource Management, (2) Ecological Restoration, and (3) Forest Products; and changing the B.S. major in wildlife and fisheries to the B.S. major in natural resource ecology and management, which will have five areas of concentration: (1) Conservation Biology, (2) Fisheries and Aquaculture, (3) Wetland Science, (4) Wildlife Ecology, and (5) Wildlife Law Enforcement Resuming the School’s history of sponsoring forestry symposia 1952-1996, the School held a Louisiana Natural Resources Symposium, July 18-20, at the on-campus Lod Cook Conference Center. Co-sponsors: La. Coop. Ext. Service, Southern Regional Extension Forester, USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station, Boise Cascade Corp., La. Forestry Assn., La. Soc. Am. Foresters, Nature Conservancy of La., Mockler Beverage, and La. Beer League. A broad array of natural resource policy, management, and utilization issues important in the southeastern U.S. were discussed. Dr. Cornelis deHoop, a member of the School's teaching and research faculty, was added to the Cooperative Extension faculty, which also includes Dr. Hallie Dozier, Dr. Richard Vlosky, and Dr. C. Leroy Shilling. Dr. Dozier received the 2005 International Society of Arboriculture Southern Chapter’s awards for Excellence in Arboricultural Research and for Excellence in Arboricultural Education. Drs. Chamberlain and Xu were promoted to associate professor. Dr. Xu served as faculty host for visiting scholars Ayed Al Omary from Jordan and Sucheon Choi from South Korea. Dr. Frank C. Rohwer was selected as the George Barineau, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Wildlife and Fisheries in the RNR School. Dr. Terrence R. Tiersch served as a visiting professor in the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Dr. W. Ramsay Smith left LSU and became Wood Global Research Manager for Arch Wood Protection, Inc. The School's faculty continued its practice, begun in 1965, of making an award of Alumnus of the Year to a distinguished alumnus of the School. Only seven students were enrolled in forestry spring camp, offered during the last eight weeks of the spring semester. In 2005 the School taught more than 70 courses, yielding more than 3,000 contact hours for students. Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans and Bogalusa on Aug. 29. Although Baton Rouge suffered only minor damage, Lee Memorial Forest 10 miles west of Bogalusa had extensive timber damage. Faculty: The 2005-06 General Catalog showed that the School had 14 professors, 6 associate professors, 6 assistant professors, and 21 adjunct faculty. School fall enrollment 2005:125 in the College of Agriculture, which included 28 forest management (lowest since 1945), 71 wildlife & fisheries (being phased out), 26 in natural resource ecology & management (new curriculum), & 74 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 4, BS (wildlife & fisheries) 13, MS (forestry) 2, MS (wildlife) 7, MS (fisheries) 4, Ph.D. (forestry) 2, Ph.D. (wildlife & fisheries science) 3; total 1926 through 2005: 1,976 bachelor, 865 master, 119 Ph.D.; grand total 2,960.
2006 Dr. Kelso continued as Interim Director of the School. A national search was conducted for a new Director, but offers were declined. Kelso reported in the Fall, 2006 School Newsletter that since the beginning of 2005, RNR faculty had more than 125 refereed journal articles published, and the School received more than $2 million in outside funding for research. Student recruiting became a priority. Since the beginning of 2005 SRNR faculty had more than 125 refereed journal articles published and received more than $2 million in outside funding to support research. Extension faculty conducted more than 50 workshops and presentations to hundreds of stakeholders, and evaluations were uniformly excellent. The tradition of having an annual spring awards reception in the School was begun. The School established the Coastal Wetlands Forests Cooperative on Regeneration and Environment, which will provide a research and education emphasis on problems related to coastal wetland forests. Dr. Hallie Dozier hired a new research/extension associate, Dr. Craig Miller, human dimensions specialist, resigned from LSU to accept a position at the University of Georgia. The RNR School now has five faculty members providing forestry extension programming: Dr. C. Leroy Shilling, Dr. Hallie Dozier, Dr. Richard Vlosky, Dr. Todd Shupe, and Dr. Cornelis de Hoop. The Forestry Spring Camp occupied the last eight weeks of the Spring semester, mostly at the School’s Lee Memorial Forest. In 2006 & 2007 LSU’s wildlife science program was ranked in the top 10 in the nation in faculty productivity by Academic Analytics. Fall enrollment 2006: 115 undergraduates and 64 graduate students. Degrees granted: BSF 5, (wildlife & fisheries 23 , MS (forestry) 3, MS (wildlife) 10, MS (fisheries) 1, Ph.D. (forestry) 4, Ph.D. (wildlife & fisheries science) 1, total 47. Degrees granted 1926 through 2006: 2,004 bachelor, 879 master, 124 Ph.D.; grand total 3,007.
2007 Longtime member of the LSU School of Renewable Natural Resources faculty and fisheries specialist, Dr. D. Allen Rutherford, Bryant A. Bateman Professor, was selected as the 10th Director of the School of Natural Resources. He took over July 1 from Dr. William Kelso, who began as Interim Director after the retirement of Dr. Blackmon on June 30, 2005. Kelso retained his position as Associate Director. The USGS Louisiana Fish & Wildlife Cooperative Research Unit consisted of Dr. Sammy King, Unit Leader; Dr. Alan D. Afton, Asst. Unit Leader, Wildlife; Dr. Megan La Peyre, Asst. Unit Leader, Fisheries; Ms. Cheryl Duplechain, Administrative Coordinator. Several RNR faculty and graduate students made presentations at the annual symposium of the La. Association of Professional Biologists in August. New methods were developed for mapping Louisiana’s coastal forests by Dr. Keim, collaborating with the Coop. Unit and the LSU Coastal Studies Institute. Dr. Keim hosted this year’s annual Gulf Forest Soils Tour. Dr. Dozier studied urban tree response to flooding generated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Research by Drs. Dean and Chambers helped the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers study tree-root growth in the levee system in New Orleans. Dr. Wu received a $791,568 grant from the U.S. Depts. of Agriculture and Energy to make natural fiber-reinforced plastic composites by use of recycled plastics and wood or other agricultural fibers. Dr. Chang conducted research on the feasibility of internal log defect scanning for sawmill applications. The RNR School was well represented at two major wetland science meetings. Dr. Rohwer undertook a radio telemetry research project of mottled ducks, and he led conducted research on hummingbird food preference. Threats to Amazonian birds were studied by Dr. Stouffer. Drs. La Peyre and Nyman completed research on wetland terraces. A new extension associate was appointed to the staff, April Chiasson, a graduate of So. University’s Urban Forestry program. Eight workshops were hosted for state-licensed arborists in LA, TX, MS, and AR. The second La. Natural Resources Symposium was held Aug. 13-14, 2007 at the Lod Cook Center, and its proceedings were published. Dr. Shilling helped conduct a hardwoods workshop in northeastern La., led 4-H students in an environmental study, and conducted other workshops on prescribed burning and logging. The Calhoun Research Station hired Dr. Cheng Piao and Dr. Hui Pan to conduct research on wood preservation and wood liquefaction; these scientists will cooperate with the La. Forest Products Development Center faculty. Dr. Charles E. Clément joined the La. Forest Products Development Center to develop a value-added wood products extension program. In January Dr. Glenn Thomas became the new Sea-Grant/AgCenter fisheries specialist and associate professor in the RNR School. Dr. Michael Stine resigned and moved to Florida. Drs. Keim, Chang, Tiersch, & Dean traveled overseas on School business. Dr. Amer H. Shah, a visiting scientist from Pakistan, worked with Drs. Chambers and Keim on baldcypress growth. Dr. Nyman cooperated with the U.S Army, Congress, and the La. Governor’s Office to promote better management of the Mississippi River watershed. Student clubs in the School, including Aquaculture and Fisheries and chapters of the Wildlife Society and Society of American Foresters, conducted a number of projects during the year. Students of Dr. Nyman founded the first student chapter (interdepartmental) of the Society of Wetland Scientists. A Hall of Fame was established by the Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries Alumni Association to honor persons who have made significant contributions to further the mission of the RNR School; Drs. Paul Y. Burns and posthumously Drs.Thomas Hansbrough and Norwin E. Linnartz were the 2007 inductees. Each of the three men has an RNR scholarship named after him. The Schreier-Edisen Foundation donated $100,000 to the LSU Foundation to establish the Barbara S. Edisen Memorial Scholarship, available to graduate students working on research projects in bottomland silviculture. Dr. Thomas Hansbrough, professor and director emeritus of the School, died in February at age 83. The School’s introductory course, RNR 1001, Natural Resource Conservation, developed by Professor Kelso, began in 1992 with 25 students; in the fall of 2007 the course enrollment had increased to 340. School fall 2007 enrollment: 124 undergraduates and 72 graduate students. Degrees awarded 2007: BSF 3, BS (wildlife & fisheries) 15, BS (natural resources ecology & management) 3, MS (forestry) 4, MS (fisheries) 2, MS (wildlife) 10, Ph.D. (forestry) 3, Ph.D. wildlife & fisheries science 1; total 41. Grand total 1926-2007: 3,048.
2008 The La. Forest Products Development Center was awarded a grant by the U.S.D.A. Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service to become the country’s 11th Center for Wood Utilization Research. On its Web site the LSU AgCenter posted a database of biomass quantities in Louisiana, collected by the LFPDC and several cooperating departments. The Engineering Composite Lab of the LFPDC is equipped with state-of-the art facilities in raw material processing, nano material and composite manufacturing, nano/microscale particle-size analysis, and thermal, mechanical, and physical property testing. The Wood Durability Lab at the LSU AgCenter became an ISO-accredited Testing Laboratory, allowing the AgCenter to help Louisiana manufacturers design and market products that meet building codes. Honored during the year were two LFPDC scientists; Dr. Niels de Hoop was appointed technical editor of the International Journal of Forest Engineering, and Dr. Richard Vlosky, LFPDC Director, received Silver Awards for Excellence from Southern Regional Extension Forestry and for an article which he wrote in the Journal of Extension. In June the School underwent a USDA-CSREES review of its research & extension programs. Director Rutherford stated that the School envisions that its role is to develop creative & novel solutions to problems of environmental management, which requires an understanding of the complexity of natural systems; the School will continue to offer a broad-based natural resource curriculum, with a wide range of applied & basic research topics, with a strong commitment to extension. In January the School helped organize a two-day meeting to review the ecosystems connected to the Atchafalaya River, and in March the School’s faculty and students participated in a conference on floodplain ecosystems of the Southeast. The U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded the LSU AgCenter a grant to become the country’s 11th Center for Wood Utilization Research; the La. Forest Products Development Center will focus on wood fiber-plastic composites. The Forestry, Wildlife, & Fisheries Alumni Association, which meets annually on LSU’s Homecoming Day, met on Nov. 15 & made its annual Alumnus-of the-Year Award, which was created by the School’s faculty in 1965. The Alumni Association also inducted two persons to its Hall of Fame, created in 2007. The School had student chapters of the Society of Am. Foresters, The Wildlife Society, Xi Sigma Pi Honor Society, American Water Resources Association; it had an Aquaculture and Fisheries Club. The first-ever 4-H all-girl forestry team competed at the annual Forestry Invitational competition in West Virginia in July. The LSU General Catalog for 2008-09 showed the following information for the School of RNR: PROFESSORS EMERITI – Avault, Bryan, Burns, Carpenter, Carter, Chabreck, Clason, Culley, Fogg, Noble. PROFESSORS – Cao, Chambers, Chang, Dean, Kelso, Liu, Reigh, Romaire, Rutherford, Shilling, Shupe, Tiersch, Vlosky, Wu. ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS – Chamberlain, de Hoop, Nyman, Rohwer, Stouffer, Thomas, Xu. ASSISTANT PROFESSORS – Dozier, Keim. Dr. Christopher Green joined the faculty as an assistant professor in aquaculture. ADJUNCT FACULTY – Afton, Barrow, Blazier, Dunn, Goyer, Hooper-Bui, Jenkins, King, LaPeyre, Lian, Lutz, Ouchley, Pace, Reams, Reed, Siegel, Singh, Smith, Supan, Sword. . Fall enrollment: 131 undergraduates and 76 graduate students. Enrollment in traditional forestry programs at U.S. universities has declined since 1996. Nation-wide, natural resources enrollments in 2008 were about 75% of the 1980 figures; enrollments in wildlife & natural resources & environment programs are increasing. Degrees granted 2008: BSF 11, BS (wildlife & fisheries) 2, BS (natural resources ecology & management) 14, MS (forestry) 5, MS (fisheries) 3, MS (wildlife) 5, Ph.D. (forestry) 3, Ph.D. (wildlife & fisheries science) 0, Total 43. Grand total 1926-2008: 3,091. These graduates of the School have distinguished themselves in forest, wildlife, and fisheries industries; in city, state, and federal agencies; in international forestry; and in higher education. In addition, many graduates have made valuable contributions to society in positions only marginally related to their major academic fields.
revised: 03-Jan-2017 9:28